Dystopian

Review: Fight For You

Cover of "Fight For You," featuring a sunny picture of the Roman Coliseum with a girl holding a sword in one of the archways
Image from Kayla Bain-Vrba

Title: Fight For You

Author: Kayla Bain-Vrba

Genre: Dystopian

Trigger Warnings: Death, blood/violence, sexual assault, whorephobia, sexualization of female characters

Back Cover:

Sold off to pay her father’s debts, Cherry spends her nights dancing and her days longing for freedom. Determined to break free of her life, she transfers from the dance halls to the stadiums, where all the real money is made.

The only problem with her plan is that she’s not a fighter. In order to learn, Cherry approaches Berlin, one of the best fighters in the stadium. Berlin, however, wants nothing to do with her, and Cherry realizes the hardest fights do not take place in the arena …

Review:

I was really excited about this book. It even made my Top 5 Want to Reads for this year. I guess the joke’s on me for getting so excited about the concept and not reading the reviews. This is the most disappointing book I’ve read this year.

So you know how based on the back cover, it seems like a lot of the story is going to be about Cherry convincing Berlin to teach her to fight? Yeah, Berlin agrees to train her on page 2. Right after their first kiss. Berlin gives Cherry an aggressive kiss after tackling her as a “show of dominance.”

Which leads me to my next problem with this book – Cherry and Berlin are both overly sexualized. At once point, Cherry says “I want people to see me as more than tits and ass,” and yet the author describes both girls mostly in terms of tits, ass, and how horny they make each other. There’s a lot of nudity. There’s a lot of random nipple sucking. There’s a lot of sexual situations that don’t fit the fact that these girls hardly know each other. And most of it reads like amateur erotica.

I don’t want to be That FeministTM, but this novella reads like it is by and for the male gaze. Cherry and Berlin are described in terms of sex appeal, their relationship develops through mutual horniness, and the level of physical intimacy they have as strangers is straight out of a random encounters erotica story. If there had been actual on-page sex when the girls had sex, I would call this amateur erotica with a veneer of gladiators slapped on top.

The pacing was also very bad. It moved much too fast and didn’t focus enough on anything to give either of the girls real emotions. The conflicts between Berlin and Cherry feel contrived and both girls get over them within a few paragraphs with no emotional growth shown, and you get no sense of the world (other than this is some sort of dystopian society where people or their family members are sold to work in The Zone if they can’t pay their debts).

A short list of other problems that I want to mention but not spend an entire paragraph on:

  • Both girls act like sex work is awful/shameful/makes you less of a person.
  • Two unnecessary sexual assault scenes.
  • It’s not really clear how one actually makes money off the fights. Maybe betting on them?
  • It’s mentioned offhandedly that the fights are mostly about the sex appeal – which is just, what???
  • The line “You’re going to be turned on when you’re fighting.”

This could have easily been expanded into a novel – and I think with time to flesh out the world and the characters of Cherry and Berlin, this could have been at least good. Berlin has an interesting past, and Cherry at least has some family history that could have been explored. The world could have been interesting. And I still love stories about fighting in arenas for money. I’m mostly upset about this novella because it could have been good, and I wanted it to be – it just wasn’t.

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High Fantasy

Review: The Golden Yarn

Cover of "The Golden Yarn," featuring a golden tree branch that forms the silhouette of a face on a blue background
Image from Cornelia Funke

Title: The Golden Yarn

Series: Mirrorworld #3

Author: Cornelia Funke

Genre: High Fantasy

Trigger Warnings: Death, blood, sex mentions, mild body horror

Spoiler Warning: This book is third in a series, so this review may contain spoilers of the previous books.

Back Cover:

Jacob Reckless continues to travel the portal in his father’s abandoned study. His name has continued to be famous on the other side of the mirror, as a finder of enchanted items and buried secrets. His family and friends, from his brother, Will to the shape-shifting vixen, Fox, are on a collision course as the two worlds become connected. Who is driving these two worlds together, and why is he always a step ahead?

This new force isn’t limiting its influence to just Jacob’s efforts – it has broadened the horizon within MirrorWorld. Jacob, Will and Fox travel east and into the Russian folklore, to the land of the Baba Yaga, pursued by a new type of being that knows our world all too well.

Review:

This is a book best read in quick succession with Reckless and Fearless, because it picks up right after Fearless leaves off and it does a disservice to this book to be trying to piece together things you don’t remember while reading it. Although it has been five years since I read Fearless, so it’s probably my own fault for not rereading the first two books before this one.

And since it’s been five years, I can’t really compare the characters to how they were in the previous books. And The Golden Yarn follows a LOT of them. Jacob and Fox, Nerron the Goyl treasure hunter, Will, the antagonist, the Dark Fairy, Kami’en the Goyl king, Jacob’s father …. There’s a lot of storylines woven through this book. (This is a book best read without distractions, otherwise it’s easy to get confused.)

The only characters I’m really going to touch on are Jacob and Fox, since they are the main protagonists and the bulk of the story focuses on them. And most of the other characters’ stories were more about plot than character, anyway.

Jacob’s theme for this book was “love.” His love for Will (and his desire to protect him) drove most of his actions, and his love for Fox drove most of his emotional arc. You still get some of his awesome treasure hunter-ness, but not as much. Fox took a bit of a back seat and ended up caught in a love triangle (which didn’t annoy me like love triangles usually do, but still).

The characters (even the minor ones) are all solid, but you really read a Mirrorworld book for the world – and the plot, which often ties in with the world. The world is enchanting and vivid and woven full of myths and magic. You get a lot in the previous books, but you get even more in this one – the characters cross multiple countries and the diversity of the magic and legends reflects that.

I want to say so much more about this book, but I don’t want to give any spoilers. This entire book is amazing. All of the subplots are fascinating and engrossing, the world is wonderful … it’s everything you want out of a Mirrorworld book. And I haven’t found anything about a sequel, but the ending of The Golden Yarn is too open-ended for this to be the last book. And besides, I want more.

The Mirrorworld series:

  1. Reckless
  2. Fearless
  3. The Golden Yarn
Did Not Finish, Fantasy

Review: Otherbound

Cover of "Otherbound," Featuring pink and purple text in front of two faces, mostly in darkness, facing opposite directions
Image from Corinne Duyvis

Title: Otherbound

Author: Corinne Duyvis

Genre: Fantasy

Trigger Warnings: Verbal abuse, physical abuse, blood/injury, character death

Back Cover:

Amara is never alone. Not when she’s protecting the cursed princess she unwillingly serves. Not when they’re fleeing across dunes and islands and seas to stay alive. Not when she’s punished, ordered around, or neglected.

She can’t be alone, because a boy from another world experiences all that alongside her, looking through her eyes.

Nolan longs for a life uninterrupted. Every time he blinks, he’s yanked from his Arizona town into Amara’s mind, a world away, which makes even simple things like hobbies and homework impossible. He’s spent years as a powerless observer of Amara’s life. Amara has no idea . . . until he learns to control her, and they communicate for the first time. Amara is terrified. Then, she’s furious.

All Amara and Nolan want is to be free of each other. But Nolan’s breakthrough has dangerous consequences. Now, they’ll have to work together to survive–and discover the truth about their connection.

Read To: Page 268

Review:

I wanted to love this book. I really did. The concept was awesome (person in our world is connected to someone in a fantasy world to the point where he literally sees through her eyes), lots of other people have good things to say about it, and the female lead is bisexual. I got about two thirds of the way through it because I wanted to love it. But I finally realized that I just didn’t care enough to finish it.

My main problem was Nolan. I didn’t like his parts of the story at all. He wasn’t a very active character – everything that happened to him seemed to happen by accident, and when he eventually discovers he can affect something in Amara’s world, he uses that power to have conversations with Amara – and compared to what was happening with Amara, his world was really boring. It was kind of hard to care about Nolan’s relationship with his sister when Amara is running for her life.

I was much more invested in Amara’s story. Amara was a solid character, with a lot of conflicting thoughts and feelings that gave her a lot of depth. She also had a crush on Cilla (the princess), which was a fun subplot and added some more complicated feelings to the mix. Her world was interesting – a pretty basic high fantasy world, but with interesting takes on mages and magic, and her situation was interesting. Difficult and seemingly hopeless, yes, but at least interesting.

Around where I stopped reading, though, even Amara’s world lost the plot a little bit. In the beginning, Amara and Cilla are running from their lives from mages who want to kill Cilla, but the man “protecting” them is also horribly abusive. It’s a life-or-death (or physical pain) high-stakes situation. But it kind of loses that – not that there isn’t danger, but it’s dialed down in exchange for some conspiracies. Which, to be fair, were interesting in their own right, but still felt like a step back from the danger of the previous parts.

If the story had been only about Amara, I might have finished it. Even though it lost the plot a bit, I might have pushed through to see how the conspiracies worked out. But I didn’t have the patience to read through Nolan’s parts, and I didn’t care enough about Amara’s story to push through his for hers.

I wanted to love this book, I really did. It just couldn’t make me care enough.

Fantasy

Review: Equal Rites

Cover of Equal Rites, featuring a purple wizard hat with light purple designs surrounded by a ring of stars and the female symbol (a circle with a cross sticking out of the bottom)
Image from Terry Pratchett Books

Title: Equal Rites

Series: Discworld #3, Witches #1

Author: Terry Pratchett

Genre: Fantasy

Trigger Warnings: Misogyny

Back Cover:

On Discworld, a dying wizard tries to pass on his powers to an eighth son of an eighth son, who is just at that moment being born. The fact that the son is actually a daughter is discovered just a little too late. The town witch insists on turning the baby into a perfectly normal witch, thus mending the magical damage of the wizard’s mistake. But now the young girl will be forced to penetrate the inner sanctum of the Unseen University–and attempt to save the world with one well-placed kick in some enchanted shins!

Review:

This is not technically my first foray into Terry Pratchett’s work, as I read Wintersmith in middle school, but literally the only thing I remember about that book is that the main character’s name was Tiffany, so I count this as my first Discworld experience.

And oh boy was it an adventure.

The two main characters are Esk and Granny Weatherwax. Esk is the girl who accidentally got wizard powers. She’s eight years old in most of the story, but except for a few moments of childish petulance/impulsiveness, she seems a lot older. She’s very intelligent and naturally good at a lot of things (probably the wizard power, but still), and I frequently forgot she was so young. She was the kind of “everybody underestimates me but I still come out on top” character that I love to read about.

Granny Weatherwax is the town witch. She knows a lot of stuff about herbs and magic and such, but her magic is just as much convincing people she’s magical (muttering nonsense “charms” and such) as actually doing magic. She very much has an air of being Too Old For This Nonsense but at the same time an attitude of Everything Will Bend To My Will Or I Will Make It Do So. And she can be very intimidating.

When you write it out, the plot is very simple. Esk gets wizard powers as a baby, Granny Weatherwax tries to turn her into a witch, but when the wizard powers get too much they decide to take her to the wizard school and convince them to take on their first female student so Esk can learn to be a wizard. But it’s the adventures along the way and the fascinating side characters that make it interesting.

For one thing, Esk and Granny Weatherwax keep getting separated. Esk is busy making her own way towards the Unseen University, wizard magic helping her along, and Granny Weatherwax spends a lot of the book annoyedly trying to find her. They both encounter interesting people and have unique takes on everything.

And while I’m on the subject of unique takes – this book has some of the best turns of phrase I’ve ever read. They’re creative ways of describing things and often don’t fit into the magical Discworld at all. Such as “a light that would make Stephen Spielberg reach for his copyright lawyer.” There’s a lot of lines like that, and a lot of really creative descriptions, and it’s overall delightful to read.

In short, I throughly enjoyed this foray into the Discworld, and I intend to return to it again. Maybe not with the next book in the series, since I’ve heard the Discworld books can pretty much be read in any order, but I’m sure my local library will have a few of these books that I could get my hands on.

The Witches Sub-Series:

  1. Equal Rites
  2. Wyrd Sisters
  3. Witches Abroad
  4. Lords and Ladies
  5. Maskerade
  6. The Sea and Little Fishes
  7. Carpe Jugulum

The Discworld Series:

There are over 40 books in this series. Just check out Goodreads’ list.

Fantasy

Review: Ice Massacre

Book cover trigger warning: Blood

Cover of "Ice Massacre," featuring an underwater image of a mermaid's tail with blood billowing off the fins.
Image from Tiana Warner

Title: Ice Massacre

Series: Mermaids of Eriana Kwai #1

Author: Tiana Warner

Genre: Fantasy

Trigger Warnings: Blood, violence, character death

Back Cover:

A mermaid’s supernatural beauty serves one purpose: to lure a sailor to his death.

The Massacre is supposed to bring peace to Eriana Kwai. Every year, the island sends its warriors to battle these hostile sea demons. Every year, the warriors fail to return. Desperate for survival, the island must decide on a new strategy. Now, the fate of Eriana Kwai lies in the hands of twenty battle-trained girls and their resistance to a mermaid’s allure.

Eighteen-year-old Meela has already lost her brother to the Massacre, and she has lived with a secret that’s haunted her since childhood. For any hope of survival, she must overcome the demons of her past and become a ruthless mermaid killer.

For the first time, Eriana Kwai’s Massacre warriors are female, and Meela must fight for her people’s freedom on the Pacific Ocean’s deadliest battleground.

Review:

I have mixed feelings about this book. On one hand, it was one of the most engaging books I’ve read in a while. On the other, it was kind of like a gory mess that I couldn’t look away from.

I got a free copy of Ice Massacre … somewhere. I don’t even remember where at this point. But I read it in three days, which is very fast for me lately. It’s definitely an engaging read, the kind that draws you in and makes you have to know how it ends.

Which is interesting, since I didn’t really get much of a feel for Meela, even though she was a narrator. There was an extended flashback at the beginning that gave some insight into her past and actually a pretty good understanding of her as a 10-year-old. But 18-year-old Meela is not a very robust character – character took a back seat to all the drama happening. That’s not to say I didn’t like her, because I did, and I was rooting for her. She just wasn’t a character with a lot of depth.

What really kept me so into the book was all the action and drama. The majority of the book takes place on the mermaid-hunting ship, so there’s a lot of mermaid attacks (which somehow managed to feel unique even though they were basically the same thing every time). There was also a remarkable amount of drama as mean girl/popular asshole Dani grows more and more unhinged.

Dani was actually my biggest problem with the book. And it’s not that she’s a bad character – on the contrary, she made a great antagonist. Characters like her, though – the one that’s absolutely horrible to the main character (and others) but always gets away with it – get under my skin. I hated her. Which, I suppose, is the point. But even though characters like her make for good reading, they bother me, and that was a strike against the book for me. You may have a different reaction.

Also, this is a very violent book. A lot of blood, a lot of gory injuries and gorier deaths. I normally don’t mind violent books, and this was almost too much for me (although to be fair, I haven’t read a super violent book in a while). So be warned – if you don’t have a stomach for gore and death, this is not the book for you.

Overall, this was a good book. Not fantastic, but definitely better than average, and an extremely engaging and absorbing read. I rooted for the protagonists and wanted to see how it ended. But I wasn’t really invested enough to read the rest of the series. If they fall into my lap like Ice Massacre did, I’ll definitely give them a shot, but I’m not going to go out of my way for book two.

The Mermaids of Eriana Kwai series:

  1. Ice Massacre
  2. Ice Crypt
  3. Ice Kingdom
Classic, Horror

Review: Carmilla

Cover of "Carmilla," featuring a black and white drawing of a girl in bed, looking at horror at another girl standing in the doorway with her back to the viewer.
Image from Fantastic Fiction

Title: Carmilla

Author: J. Sheridan Le Fanu

Genre: Horror/Classic

Trigger Warnings: Death, blood

Back Cover:

Laura, a young woman deprived of much social interaction on her father’s isolated estate, is disappointed when an expected visitor dies before arriving at her father’s chateau. So she is thrilled when a carriage accident leaves another young woman staying with them until her mother returns from her urgent journey. But there is something darker hiding inside the captivating and charismatic Carmilla.

A classic Victorian vampire novella, Carmilla influenced Bram Stoker’s later treatment of the vampire mythos in Dracula.

Review:

I saw a post on Tumblr recommending this, and it was free on Project Gutenberg and a short read. (Short enough to read while waiting for my fiance to stop snoozing his alarms and get out of bed, actually, which was about 40 minutes.) It’s a short novella, so this is going to be a short review.

This is an old book, and it’s written with a definitely older writing style – dense, exposition-heavy, and packed with vocabulary words that may make you turn to a dictionary. It did take some getting used to (it’s been a while since I’ve read an old book), but I do like that kind of style.

The characters are pretty bare-bones, but that’s kind of expected in a book so short. (And in my opinion, the elegant and lengthy writing made up for what lacked in characterization.) You get the impression that Laura (who narrates) is overall happy with her life but still lonely. Carmilla gets the most characterization – she was charismatic and vibrant, though prone to physical weakness, and intensely affectionate towards Laura, but there are also hints that an equally intense temper underneath her veneer.

I also found it interesting that the female vampire only preyed on female victims, and there were definitely some gay vibes in Carmilla’s affection for Laura. (Of course, that could be my modern brain reading things into 1800s ways of expressing feelings, but I like to think it was at least a little gay.)

Carmilla was a short book, but it was good. It had interesting vampire lore, a cool vampire character, and actually a pretty good atmosphere for as short as it was. Plus, it’s free on Project Gutenberg, so why not give it a shot?

Science Fiction

Review: Republic’s Chosen

Cover of "Republic's Chosen," featuring a multicolored feather curled inside a circle
Image from Goodreads

Title: Republic’s Chosen

Series: After the World Ends #1

Author: Rory I

Genre: Military Science Fiction

Trigger Warnings: According to the book: Background and secondary character death, bullying, discrimination (macro and microaggressions), in-combat violence and cruelty, institutional bigotry, mentions of PTSD, mild sexual content, sexual assault, spousal neglect. I add: Blood/gore.

Back Cover:

The world had never seen utopias until the Latin Republic was established. Equality, respect, humane treatment – all of those drive the society’s philosophy after the Great Disaster.

Yet humanity has not learned to leave war behind. When the Republic sends summons to Liana, she knows it’s illegal. Her immigrant status forbids her from fighting in the army, but the country’s leaders want control over her and they won’t stop at anything to get it.

Under the pressure of a tough training regime, threatened by a complicated political plot she must quickly untangle, it is no surprise Liana’s marriage begins to crumble. Tossed in a training campus and immediately involved in its intrigue, Liana needs allies quickly, but all she wants to do is crush the system which holds her hostage. With each passing day, it’s becoming harder to reconcile the need to hide her real identity and the desire to protect her immigrant countryfolk from harm.

An old friend returns to her life just in time to give her the leverage she needs. There is no chance she’s ever coming back to her peaceful life in hiding.

A strong bisexual lead, a secret identity, Special Forces soldiers, true friendship, and a headstrong trauma survivor trying to accept her role in saving the world.

Review:

I was really excited to read this book. I got a free ebook copy through the Sapphic Book Club, so it promised to be pretty gay, and the description sounded right up my alley. (The description I read also included something about Liana being former special forces and totally showing up everyone else in the army, which is a trope I love, but I can’t for the life of me find the description I read.)

Overall, Republic’s Chosen was good, but disappointing.

I liked Liana, to a point. She was skilled way above the basic training camp she was sent to, which I really enjoyed. She was also insubordinate and a troublemaker, which sometimes I enjoyed and sometimes seemed just too much. Mostly she was just stifled by the strict rules of the military – which I understand, but I didn’t like. (Also I don’t recall it mentioned anywhere on-page that she’s bi.)

Liana’s husband Marcus was most definitely not my favorite character. At the beginning, I thought he was a kind of a dick. By the time I got to the end, I wouldn’t necessarily call him a dick, but he definitely rubbed me the wrong way. I just couldn’t put my finger on why.

A lot of the minor/less major characters were really good, though. Most of them were queer (and it’s a common practice in this world to state your pronouns when you introduce yourself), and they all had little things that defined them, even though they often didn’t get a lot of page time.

I feel like the world could have been good if there’d been more of it. You don’t get a whole lot about this world, other than there is a big conflict between the Latin Republic (which I think encompassed the Americas?) and the Slavic … countries? I don’t know, that wasn’t very clear. And you get little details about things in the Latin Republic (unimportant stuff, like the women wear eye makeup under the eyes instead of on the lids) from Liana’s perspective, but you don’t get anything about how it came to be the Latin Republic, what the Great Disaster was, or even what the society’s philosophy is. The book was stuck on the military base, and that made it difficult to explore the world.

This book was just far too military for me. It was too focused on the training camp and the military exercises and the recruits and the rules and the hierarchy. I’m not a fan of the military industrial complex, and I expected there to be less obedience and submission to the military’s rules and regulations than there was. The structure and hierarchy felt like it was suffocating the story (which I suppose was intentional, since it was restricting to Liana, too).

I also didn’t like the married couple aspect of it. I don’t know why, and it’s completely a personal preference, but the conflict in Liana’s marriage in addition to everything else just didn’t fit for me. It felt like it added just another layer of complicated on a book that already had too much going on.

This was a long book – 400+ pages. And even with all that page time, it felt like there was too much happening. Liana and Marcus had conflicts with almost everyone, it seemed, as well as with the military structure in general. Then there was their marriage under strain from the being in the military thing. And everywhere they turn running up against restricting military regulations. And did I mention conflicts with almost everyone, including friends from their special forces days?

Okay, this review is a little disjointed and I’m trying to say a lot in a small space. I’m not completely sure what I’m trying to say, though. I did not like this book, but I can’t put my finger on exactly why. Military scifi is definitely not my thing, but there was just too much going on and I didn’t like the characters enough to actually enjoy this. If you like military scifi, though, you’ll probably enjoy this much more.

The After the World Ends series:

  1. Republic’s Chosen
  2. Blacklight (After the World Ends 1.5)
  3. Republic’s Reach (not yet released)

 

Horror

Review: Salem’s Lot

Cover of "Salem's Lot," showing the head and neck of a feminine person whose skin is nearly white; their head is tilted back and there are two bleeding puncture wounds in their neck.
Image from Stephen King

Title: Salem’s Lot

Author: Stephen King

Genre: Horror

Trigger Warnings: Death, blood, gore, child abuse, spousal abuse, rape mention

Back Cover:

Stephen King’s second novel, Salem’s Lot, Is the story of a mundane town under siege from the forces of darkness. Considered one of the most terrifying vampire novels ever written, it cunningly probes the shadows of the human heart–and the insular evils of small-town America.

Review:

Now, before you go, “horror? Jalyn doesn’t read horror” – I know. This isn’t the kind of thing I would normally pick up. But my fiance is a HUGE Stephen King fan and he’s been pestering me for ages to read something by him. Eventually, I ran out of library books and agreed to give it a try.

(This was back in late November, mind you – my fiance’s mass market paperback copy is 631 pages and I just now finished it.)

This book has the biggest ensemble cast I think I’ve ever read, so I’m not going to talk about every character. It spends some time with pretty much everyone in Salem’s Lot. But the character who gets the most page time is Ben Mears, a moderately successful writer who grew up in Salem’s Lot and returned to work on his newest book. He also hopes to be able to process his feelings about the decidedly creepy Marsten House and the trauma of, as a child, being the one to find the body of Hubert Marsten in the house.

The rest of the characters mostly rely on stereotypes for you to get to “know” them – like the town gossip or that one guy who everyone thinks is weird but he doesn’t mind doing that job no one wants so they put up with him. But somehow King manages to make that stereotyping feel artful, so I didn’t mind it at all.

The first half of the book goes really slowly. It spends a lot of time building atmosphere – it’s a small town, with all its small town positives and negatives (which will be quickly recognized by anyone who’s lived in a small town), but there’s also something eerie and possibly a little evil living there, and it’s centered on the Marsten House. It also spends a lot of time on characters, especially Ben and how everyone in the town reacts to him. If you’re the kind of person who doesn’t like in-depth character studies or would rather sacrifice atmosphere for action, you will hate this. And honestly, I liked it and it still took me two months to get through it.

I feel like anything I say about the second half will be a spoiler, because the book spends so much time setting up the mysteries and vague uneasiness that gets revealed in the second half. That’s where the vague uneasiness grows and becomes the full-blown horror. I also think it dragged a little towards the end – the last hundred pages were a slog for me. They weren’t bad, I just wanted to find out the ending and wanted King to dispense with the lengthy descriptions and get on with the story.

To be honest, I didn’t find it that horror-y. But I think a large part of it was that I was reading it in bright light, sitting on the couch next to my fiance while he played video games, and kept getting distracted by the game and interrupted by my fiance’s occasional comments. I’m sure if I’d read it alone at night (or even in an environment where I wasn’t interrupted frequently), it would have been much scarier.

I will say one thing – Stephen King can write. Not that I was surprised, since he’s such a hugely bestselling author, but it was good. Lengthy and lyrical, but he has a remarkable knack for descriptions and I didn’t even mind how lengthy they were. It just added atmosphere. Whether or not you like his subject matter, he’s certainly a master of writing. (And this is only his second novel, I’m sure his later ones are even better.)

Okay, this is already pretty long, so I’m going to finish up with this: Salem’s Lot really wasn’t my kind of book, and I highly doubt I’ll read another Stephen King. But King is an excellent writer, and even though I wasn’t particularly invested in the story, he made me need to know how it ended. It’s not good in the sense that I liked it (I’m still not sure if I did or not), but it’s definitely good in the sense that it is a solid, well-written book.

Superhero

Review: Hero

Cover of "Hero," featuring a white male pulling open a white button-down shirt to reveal a tee shirt with the word "Hero" written on it.
Image from Lezbrarian

Title: Hero

Author: Perry Moore

Genre: Superhero

Trigger Warnings: Violence/blood, death, homophobia

Back Cover:

The last thing in the world Thom Creed wants is to add to his father’s pain, so he keeps secrets. Like that he has special powers. And that he’s been asked to join the League – the very organization of superheroes that spurned his dad. But the most painful secret of all is one Thom can barely face himself: he’s gay.

But becoming a member of the League opens up a new world to Thom. There, he connects with a misfit group of aspiring heroes, including Scarlett, who can control fire but not her anger; Typhoid Larry, who can make anyone sick with his touch; and Ruth, a wise old broad who can see the future. Like Thom, these heroes have things to hide; but they will have to learn to trust one another when they uncover a deadly conspiracy within the League.

To survive, Thom will face challenges he never imagined. To find happiness, he’ll have to come to terms with his father’s past and discover the kind of hero he really wants to be.

Review:

Part of me wanted my last review of 2017 to be more momentous than this, but this happened to be the book I took with me while I waited for my car to get repaired. So it is what it is, I guess. And Hero isn’t a bad book, really.

I don’t know what to say about Thom. He’s one of those characters that’s hard to review – he was a good, solid character who I related to and who developed throughout the course of the story. But at the same time, he was kind of unremarkable. Don’t get me wrong, he didn’t feel like that while reading, but now I’m trying to write about him and I’m drawing a blank.

(Also, he’s very awkward and does quite a bit of putting his foot in his mouth. It made him seem real, but if you suffer from secondhand embarrassment like I do, there are parts where you’ll just want to crawl in a hole.)

I also liked that there were disabled characters in this book – namely Thom and his dad (Thom has some sort of seizure disorder and his dad’s hand is crippled). It’s not something you see a lot and I liked the diversity.

The other characters were all great. They had interesting backstories, quirks, and flaws. Ruth was a fascinating lady and pushed Thom to be a better person. Scarlett started off as the I-hate-you-but-we-have-to-work-together trope but became a friend by the end. Larry … okay, Larry was minor. But you also get backstories and character journeys of Thom’s parents (well, at least his dad), which I thought was neat that the book managed to do that while still focusing on Thom.

That whole “deadly conspiracy within the League” thing? That doesn’t really come up until the climax. Well, there’s a little bit of “the League thinks this villain did this crime but Thom knows he didn’t so they’re looking for the actual culprit,” but that really takes a backseat to the characters. The story is really about Thom dealing with homophobia and the growth and dynamics of him and his team of aspiring superheroes. Sure, there was some action, but it was more emotional than anything.

The only thing I really had a problem with was the romance. I saw it coming (not a bad thing), but the love interest didn’t get a lot of page time. On one hand, I understand why and it would have been hard to work more scenes in with him, but on the other, it felt a little like it came out of the blue considering how little interaction Thom had with him before the end.

Overall, this was a good book. Not spectacular, but definitely better than “meh.” It has its flaws, and for a superhero book it’s more focused on character dynamics and the emotional aspect, but I enjoyed it. It was a solidly good book.

Next week I’ll be doing my 2017 in Books post, where I round up my top reads of 2017, plus a few more I’m excited for in 2018. Stay tuned!

Science Fantasy

Webcomic Spotlight: Lady of the Shard

Cover of "Lady of the Shard," featuring white text on a black background with white dots of varying sizes that look like stars in the night sky.

Title: Lady of the Shard

Author: Gigi D.G.

Genre: Science Fantasy

Trigger Warnings: Manipulation in mildly sexual situations, mind control, mild body horror

Summary:

Lady of the Shard is a comic about an acolyte in love with the goddess she serves.

Review:

“Lady of the Shard” is short, but a whole lot happens! It starts off with a cute, overeager acolyte falling in love with the goddess she serves, and trying to deal with her complicated feelings about it. Things change when a monster (that’s actually not a monster) shows up … and that’s all that I can really say without spoilers, but there are several twists.

Also, the art is really cool and different – it’s very sketch-like, and white on a black (or occasionally pink) background.

Panel from "Lady of the Shard," with white lines on a black background. Two figures in hoods and long cloaks are next to a third, feminine figure; one holds a pillow and the other holds a bowl of food. The person in the middle looks surprised by the kindness. Text above them reads, "We followers of t he Goddess welcome all visitors with open arms. So we've really done our best to take care of the Phoenix."
And in my opinion, it looks really cool.

And did I mention this all takes place in space? The goddess saved humanity after the earth was destroyed, and so all the people living near the various stars bring tribute to her temple, which is a giant star-shaped thing floating in space. Despite that, though, it has a definite fantasy feeling.

“Lady of the Shard” is a great story with more action than you’d expect, an amazing antagonist, and a completely adorable protagonist. It’s a quick read, and in my opinion, totally worth it.

You can read it online for free here! (May not work well with mobile devices.)